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Inproceedings Reference Structural framework: a new way to organise and communicate geological information
A structural framework is a well-defined concept, being used primarily to add structural understanding to a geological model. Within GeoConnect³d, a new approach is used, i.e. the structural framework concept is modified to become the leading model, in which geological maps and models can be inserted and related to. This structural framework is being developed and implemented for two areas of interest - Roer-to-Rhine in northwest Europe and Pannonian Basin in eastern Europe - and will soon be implemented in two pilot areas, Ireland and Bavaria. The organisation of information is strongly linked to different scales of visualisation, starting from the pan-European view (1:15,000,000) with the possibility to zoom in to the scale of local geological models and maps in these four areas. The GeoConnect³d structural framework reorganises geological information in terms of geological limits and geological units. Limits are defined as broadly planar structures that separate a given geological unit from its neighbouring units, e.g. faults (limits) that define a graben (unit), or an unconformity (limit) that defines a basin (unit). Therefore, the key relationship between these two structural framework elements is that units are defined by limits i.e. all units must be bounded by limits. It is important to note that this relationship is not necessarily mutual: not all limits have to be unit-defining. A first test of the structural framework methodology was carried out in the Netherlands and Belgium for the Roer Valley graben, as the faults in this area were already modelled in a cross-boundary project (H3O-Roer Valley Graben). Displaying different elements according to scale of visualisation coupled with vocabulary information (definition, grouping and semantic relations between elements, etc.) following the SKOS-system proved a powerful tool to display geological information in an understandable way and improve insights in large-scale geological structures crossing national borders. Additionally, links with other GeoERA projects such as HIKE and its fault database are being successfully established. We consider the outcomes of this test promising to fulfil one of the main goals of GeoConnect³d, i.e. preparing and disclosing geological information in an understandable way for stakeholders. We also consider this as the way forward towards pan-European integration and harmonisation of geological information, where the ultimate challenge is to correlate or otherwise link information from different geological domains and of different scales. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 731166.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Inproceedings Reference Investigating geological processes and their links with geological structures through geomanifestations
GeoConnect³d introduced the concept of geomanifestations to define any distinct local expression of ongoing or past geological processes. These manifestations, or anomalies, often point to specific geologic conditions and, therefore, can be important sources of information to improve geological understanding of an area. Examples include seismicity, gas seeps, local compositional differences in groundwater and springs, thermal anomalies, mineral occurrences, jumps in hydraulic head, overpressured zones and geomorphological features. Geomanifestations are an addition to the structural framework model also being developed in GeoConnect³d, aiming to show where and how processes and structures may be linked. Data on geomanifestations are being collected in three areas: the Roer-to-Rhine area of interest in northwest Europe, and the Mura-Zala Basin and Battonya High within the Pannonian Basin area of interest in Eastern Europe. A first assessment of available data showed that groundwater-related geomanifestations in the form of anomalies in chemical composition (enrichment in elements such as Fe, or hydrocarbon gases and CO2,) or temperature (thermal water springs, geothermal anomaly in wells) are mappable in all areas. These geomanifestations point to special geological features in each area, such as proximity to magmatic reservoirs, presence of deep-rooted faults and considerable differences in the subsurface relief (trough–high system of the basement) among others. These anomalies at times define spatial patterns, which might or not be represented in the structural framework model, thus demonstrating whether they can be explained by the current geological understanding embedded in the structural framework. With this first test, we conclude that data on groundwater-related geomanifestations add to the robustness of the structural framework model. Further investigations with other types of geomanifestations are foreseen. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 731166.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Inproceedings Reference FRAME’s (Forecasting and Assessing Europe’s Strategic Raw Materials Needs) innovative research in mineral raw materials on the eve of the EU’s “Green Deal”.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Inproceedings Reference FRAME’s (Forecasting and Assessing Europe’s Strategic Raw Materials Needs) contribution to the “European Green Deal”.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Article Reference New Neandertal fossils from Trou Magrite, Belgium, and their contribution to our understanding of Neandertal diversity
Belgium has yielded an exceptional Neandertal fossil record that has played a major role in Neandertal studies since the 19th century. Here we present the outcome of a new multidisciplinary project that aimed at re-assessing the skeletal collections from the Belgian site of Trou Magrite. This site yielded rich archeological assemblages spanning from the Middle and Upper Paleolithic to the Mesolithic, Neolithic, and Iron Age. We revised the already known human collection, conducted a systematic sorting of the faunal material, and combined the use of morphometrics, taphonomy, stable isotopes, dating, and genetic analyses to perform taxonomic and chronocultural identifications. This resulted in the identification of two new Neandertal fossils among the faunal material excavated in the 19th century: an upper right permanent canine representing an adult individual, and the left femur diaphysis of a ca. 8-10-month-old infant. We will present the biological characteristics and mitochondrial DNA phylogenetic position of the Trou Magrite Neandertals, in particular with regard to the other Northern European Neandertals. Our project adds a ninth site to the list of Belgian sites that have yielded Neandertal fossils, and emphasizes the existence of a low genetic diversity among Late Neandertals, which is to be compared to their significant behavioral (mortuary and technical) variability. As such, Belgian Neandertals continue to contribute significantly to our understanding of the population processes that resulted in the disappearance of this group. This research was funded by the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences of CSUN and the CSUN Competition for Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity Awards.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Inproceedings Reference Speleothem record from Pentadactylos cave (Cyprus): high-resolution insight into climatic variations during MIS 6 and MIS 5
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Article Reference How the Genus Eusirus amphipods evolved and speciated in the Antarctic
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Article Reference In depth exploration of the biodiversity of asterozoan fauna in Admiralty Bay and Bransfield Strait, Antarctic Peninsula
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Article Reference Metagenomics of tsunami deposits: developments, challenges and recommendations from a case study on the Shetland Islands (UK)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Article Reference Metagenomics of tsunami deposits: developments, challenges and recommendations from a case study on the Shetland Islands (UK)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020