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Book Reference 5000 ans avant J.-C., La grande migration ? Le Néolithique ancien dans la Collection Louis Éloy. Catalogue d’exposition du Musée de Préhistoire de Ramioul, Collection du Patrimoine culturel, n° 3, [Bruxelles]
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2016
Inbook Reference A jadeitite axehead in the midst of the famous Neolithic flint mines of Spiennes?
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2019
Inbook Reference A Late Period fish deposit at Oxyrhynchus (el-Bahnasa, Egypt)
We describe the abundant faunal remains that were found in an extensive ritual deposit discovered in 2012 at Oxyrhynchus. This site in Middle Egypt has been famous since the first millennium BC for the mormyrid fish that were worshipped there and after which the town was named. The role played by these fish has already been amply documented through textual evidence, bronze statuettes and paintings, but until now, no remains and no mummies of these fish had been found. We first describe the ritual deposit as a whole, with emphasis on its extent, its stratigraphy and its relationship to the surrounding structures, which, together with a very specific artefact, allow the layers to be dated to the Late Period. The fish remains, as well as the sparse mammal bones, are quantified using both number of identified specimens (NISP) and minimum number of individuals (MNI). Body length reconstructions of the mormyrid fish are carried out using newly derived regression equations. Because of the large quantity of material, we performed the taxonomic identifications and size reconstructions on subsamples from which estimates were then made for the total number of fish that may have been present in the entire deposit. Attention was given to the way in which the fish bundles were prepared, a process that involved both the use of textiles and halfa grass, and to how the deposit was organised. We discuss the species spectrum in relation to both the Egyptian fish cult and evidence from written sources. Finally, we attempt to reconstruct the different events that may have taken place between the capture of the fish and their final deposition at the site, using a combination of both zoological/ecological and papyrological evidence.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2019
Article Reference A review of Stenostylus Pilsbry, 1898 and Drymaeus Albers, 1850 (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Orthalicoidea: Bulimulidae) from Colombia, with description of new species
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2019
Inproceedings Reference Aalst, Leopoldstraat 42. De dagelijkse voeding in bezet België in 1917 (O.-Vl.)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Ancient DNA reveals lack of postglacial habitat tracking in the arctic fox
How species respond to an increased availability of habitat, for example at the end of the last glaciation, has been well established. In contrast, little is known about the opposite process, when the amount of habitat decreases. The hypothesis of habitat tracking predicts that species should be able to track both increases and decreases in habitat availability. The alternative hypothesis is that populations outside refugia become extinct during periods of unsuitable climate. To test these hypotheses, we used ancient DNA techniques to examine genetic variation in the arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) through an expansion/contraction cycle. The results show that the arctic fox in midlatitude Europe became extinct at the end of the Pleistocene and did not track the habitat when it shifted to the north. Instead, a high genetic similarity between the extant populations in Scandinavia and Siberia suggests an eastern origin for the Scandinavian population at the end of the last glaciation. These results provide new insights into how species respond to climate change, since they suggest that populations are unable to track decreases in habitat availability. This implies that arctic species may be particularly vulnerable to increases in global temperatures. © 2007 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Ancient RNA from Late Pleistocene permafrost and historical canids shows tissue-specific transcriptome survival
While sequencing ancient DNA (aDNA) from archaeological material is now commonplace, very few attempts to sequence ancient transcriptomes have been made, even from typically stable deposition environments such as permafrost. This is presumably due to assumptions that RNA completely degrades relatively quickly, particularly when dealing with autolytic, nuclease-rich mammalian tissues. However, given the recent successes in sequencing ancient RNA (aRNA) from various sources including plants and animals, we suspect that these assumptions may be incorrect or exaggerated. To challenge the underlying dogma, we generated shotgun RNA data from sources that might normally be dismissed for such study. Here, we present aRNA data generated from two historical wolf skins, and permafrost-preserved liver tissue of a 14,300-year-old Pleistocene canid. Not only is the latter the oldest RNA ever to be sequenced, but it also shows evidence of biologically relevant tissue specificity and close similarity to equivalent data derived from modern-day control tissue. Other hallmarks of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data such as exon-exon junction presence and high endogenous ribosomal RNA (rRNA) content confirms our data’s authenticity. By performing independent technical library replicates using two high-throughput sequencing platforms, we show not only that aRNA can survive for extended periods in mammalian tissues but also that it has potential for tissue identification. aRNA also has possible further potential, such as identifying in vivo genome activity and adaptation, when sequenced using this technology.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2019
Article Reference Apport à la chronologie absolue des minières néolithiques de Spiennes
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Aquatic fauna from the Takarkori rock shelter reveals the Holocene central Saharan climate and palaeohydrography
The abundant faunal remains from the Takarkori rock shelter in the Tadrart Acacus region of southwestern Libya are described. The material that covers the period between 10,200 to 4650 years cal BP illustrates the more humid environmental conditions in the Central Sahara during early and middle Holocene times. Particular attention is focussed on the aquatic fauna that shows marked diachronic changes related to increasing aridification. This is reflected in the decreasing amount of fish remains compared to mammals and, within the fish fauna, by changes through time in the proportion of the species and by a reduction of fish size. The aquatic fauna can, in addition, be used to formulate hypotheses about the former palaeohydrographical network. This is done by considering the possible location of pre-Holocene relic populations combined with observations on the topography and palaeohydrological settings of the Central Sahara.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Book Reference Archeologisch evaluatieonderzoek van een prehistorische vindplaats (mesolithicum tot vroege bronstijd) in het Sigma- gebied ‘Zennegat’ (Mechelen, prov. Antwerpen)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications