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Proceedings Reference Diversity of insects in various types of forest near Yangambi with special attention to the hybotids flies (Diptera: Hybotidae)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Proceedings Reference Contribution à la connasissance des saturniidae de la réserve forestière de Masako à Kisangani /RD Congo - tribu des Buaeini (Lepidoptera / Heterocera: Saturniidae, Satruniinae)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Proceedings Reference Assessment of insect biodiversity in the tropics using megadiverse flies : examples from mangrove habitats in Southeast Asia
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Proceedings Reference Ecology and site quality assessment of mangroves using Dolichopodidae: A case study in Singapore
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Proceedings Reference Ecology and site quality assessment of mangroves using Dolichopodiae: A case study in Singapore
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Proceedings Reference Assessment of insect biodiversity in the tropics using megadiverse flies: examples from mangrove habitats in Southeast Asia
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Palaeolithic dogs and Pleistocene wolves revisited: a reply to Morey
This is a reply to the comments of Morey (2014) on our identification of Palaeolithic dogs from several European Palaeolithic sites. In his comments Morey (2014) presents some misrepresentations and misunderstandings that we remedy here. In contrast to what Morey (2014) propounds, our results suggest that the domestication of the wolf was a long process that started early in the Upper Palaeolithic and that since that time two sympatric canid morphotypes can be seen in Eurasian sites: Pleistocene wolves and Palaeolithic dogs. Contrary to Morey (2014), we are convinced that the study of this domestication process should be multidisciplinary.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Inferring internal anatomy from the trilobite exoskeleton: the relationship between frontal auxiliary impressions and the digestive system
Located in Library / No RBINS Staff publications
Article Reference The evolutionary history of Neanderthal and Denisovan Y chromosomes
The genomes of archaic hominins have been sequenced and compared with that of modern humans. However, most archaic individuals with high-quality sequences available have been female. Petr et al. performed targeted sequencing of the paternally inherited Y chromosomes from three Neanderthals and two Denisovans (see the Perspective by Schierup). Comparisons with available archaic and diverse modern human Y chromosomes indicated that, similar to the maternally inherited mitochondria, the human and Neanderthal Y chromosomes were more closely related to each other compared with the Denisovan Y chromosome. This result supports the conclusion that interbreeding between early humans and Neanderthals and selection replaced the more ancient Denisovian-like Y chromosome and mitochondria in Neanderthals.Science, this issue p. 1653; see also p. 1565Ancient DNA has provided new insights into many aspects of human history. However, we lack comprehensive studies of the Y chromosomes of Denisovans and Neanderthals because the majority of specimens that have been sequenced to sufficient coverage are female. Sequencing Y chromosomes from two Denisovans and three Neanderthals shows that the Y chromosomes of Denisovans split around 700 thousand years ago from a lineage shared by Neanderthals and modern human Y chromosomes, which diverged from each other around 370 thousand years ago. The phylogenetic relationships of archaic and modern human Y chromosomes differ from the population relationships inferred from the autosomal genomes and mirror mitochondrial DNA phylogenies, indicating replacement of both the mitochondrial and Y chromosomal gene pools in late Neanderthals. This replacement is plausible if the low effective population size of Neanderthals resulted in an increased genetic load in Neanderthals relative to modern humans.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Article Reference A century of coping with environmental and ecological changes via compensatory biomineralization in mussels
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2021