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Inbook Reference Two decennia of faunal analysis at Sagalassos
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Informe preliminar dels treballs arqueològics realitzats a Oxirrinc (El-Bahnasa, Minia , Egipte), durant la campanya de 2013
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Memòria preliminar del les excavacions de la campanya de 2014 a El-Bahnasa, Oxirrinc (Minia, Egipte)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Inproceedings Reference Aalst, Leopoldstraat 42. De dagelijkse voeding in bezet België in 1917 (O.-Vl.)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Whole-genome shotgun sequencing of mitochondria from ancient hair shafts
Although the application of sequencing-by-synthesis techniques to DNA extracted from bones has revolutionized the study of ancient DNA, it has been plagued by large fractions of contaminating environmental DNA. The genetic analyses of hair shafts could be a solution: We present 10 previously unexamined Siberian mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) mitochondrial genomes, sequenced with up to 48-fold coverage. The observed levels of damage-derived sequencing errors were lower than those observed in previously published frozen bone samples, even though one of the specimens was >50,000 14C years old and another had been stored for 200 years at room temperature. The method therefore sets the stage for molecular-genetic analysis of museum collections.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Ancient DNA reveals lack of postglacial habitat tracking in the arctic fox
How species respond to an increased availability of habitat, for example at the end of the last glaciation, has been well established. In contrast, little is known about the opposite process, when the amount of habitat decreases. The hypothesis of habitat tracking predicts that species should be able to track both increases and decreases in habitat availability. The alternative hypothesis is that populations outside refugia become extinct during periods of unsuitable climate. To test these hypotheses, we used ancient DNA techniques to examine genetic variation in the arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) through an expansion/contraction cycle. The results show that the arctic fox in midlatitude Europe became extinct at the end of the Pleistocene and did not track the habitat when it shifted to the north. Instead, a high genetic similarity between the extant populations in Scandinavia and Siberia suggests an eastern origin for the Scandinavian population at the end of the last glaciation. These results provide new insights into how species respond to climate change, since they suggest that populations are unable to track decreases in habitat availability. This implies that arctic species may be particularly vulnerable to increases in global temperatures. © 2007 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Book Reference Archeologisch evaluatieonderzoek van een prehistorische vindplaats (mesolithicum tot vroege bronstijd) in het Sigma- gebied ‘Zennegat’ (Mechelen, prov. Antwerpen)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Book Reference Archeologisch evaluatieonderzoek van een prehistorische en Romeinse vindplaats in het Sigma- gebied ‘Wijmeers 2’ (gemeente Wichelen,provincie Oost-Vlaanderen)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Boussu-Boussu: la faune du château de Boussu
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
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