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Article Reference A comparative study of Ligophorus uruguayense and L. saladensis (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) from Mugil liza (Teleostei: Mugilidae) in southern Brazil
Representatives of Ligophorus Euzet et Suriano, 1977 were found on the gills of Mugil liza Valenciennes caught in southern Brazil. They were identified as Ligophorus uruguayense Failla Siquier et Ostrowski de Núñez, 2009 and Ligophorus saladensis Marcotegui et Martorelli, 2009, even though specific identification proved to be difficult due to inconsistencies in some diagnostic features reported for these two species. Therefore, a combined morphological and molecular approach was used to critically review the validity of these species, by means of phase contrast and confocal fluorescence microscopical examination of sclerotised hard parts, and assessing the genetic divergence between L. saladensis, L. uruguayense and their congeners using rDNA sequences. The main morphological differences between the two species relate to the shape of the accessory piece of the penis and the median process of the ventral bar. The accessory piece in L. uruguayense is shorter than in L. saladensis, has a cylindrical, convex upper lobe and straight lower lobe (vs with the distal tip of the lower lobe turning away from the upper lobe in the latter species). The ventral bar has a V-shaped anterior median part in L. uruguayense (vs U-shaped in L. saladensis). The two species are suggested to be part of a species complex together with L. mediterraneus Sarabeev, Balbuena et Euzet, 2005. We recommend to generalise such comparative assessment of species of Ligophorus for a reliable picture of the diversity and diversification mechanisms within the genus, and to make full use of its potential as an additional marker for mullet taxonomy and systematics.
Located in Library / No RBINS Staff publications
Article Reference A comparison between active and passive communities of Ostracoda (Crustacea) in a tropical temporary lake
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Article Reference A comparison between the ostracod (Crustacea, Ostracoda) faunas of the Pantanal and the upper Paraná River floodplains (Brazil).
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A comparison of 2D storm surge models applied to three shallow European seas
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A comparison of gene flow estimates based on private allele frequencies.
The frequency of private alleles is often used to assess the amount of gene flow (Nm) between populations, with the equations proposed by SLATKIN (1985b) and by SLATKIN and BARTON (1989). Although these equations express the same relationship, they may yield different estimates of gene flow for the same data. These differences increase with decreasing frequencies of private alleles. Comparisons of Nm estimates, based on different equations can therefore be misleading. It is advisable to use these equations method only to distinguish between Nm > 1 and Nm < 1.
Located in Associated publications / Belgian Journal of Zoology / Bibliographic References
Article Reference A comparison of three main scientific literature databases using a search in aquatic ecology
Online searches for relevant scientific references using keywords have become common practice. Several multidisciplinary scientific online databases are available, of which Web of Science, Scopus (both payable) and Google Scholar (free of charge) are the most commonly used. We test the hypothesis that results of highly similar searches in these three databases do not necessarily give comparable results. We set out to query the three databases with a real example on “diapause in microcrustaceans” (Cladocera, Copepoda and Ostracoda), using the same time period (2012–2021), the same keywords with the same syntaxis and the same sorting criterion (“relevance”), and compared the first 100 hits provided by each database. There were several references provided which were irrelevant to the search, especially in the Web of Science, and of the remaining relevant references, only 9.84% were provided by all three databases. Our survey showed significant differences amongst the results provided by the databases, especially for “hydroperiod” and “type of environment”. These differences can be the result of different coverage of the scientific literature by the databases, but also of the different ways by which the criterion “relevance” is calculated by the three algorithms. We, therefore, recommend that literature surveys must be based on several databases; otherwise, the results might become biased.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2022
Article Reference A complete insect from the Late Devonian period
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A complete skull of Allodaposuchus precedens Nopcsa, 1928 (Eusuchia) and a reassessment of the morphology of the taxon based on the romanian remains
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A Comprehensive Molecular Phylogeny of Dalytyphloplanida (Platyhelminthes: Rhabdocoela) Reveals Multiple Escapes from the Marine Environment and Origins of Symbiotic Relationships
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A comprehensive review on structural tsunami countermeasures.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2022