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Article Reference A high-resolution DEM for the Top-Palaeogene surface of the Belgian Continental Shelf
A 1:250,000 scale map of the surface of the Top-Palaeogene for the Belgian Continental Shelf was created based on extensive analyses of older and recent geological and geophysical datasets. The Top-Palaeogene surface is an important polygenetic unconformity that truncates older strata of the Palaeogene and to a smaller extent some of Neogene age from the overlying Quaternary deposits. As such it represents the base of the latter. The represented surface has been diachronously shaped and reworked through Late Quaternary times by different geological processes (e.g. fluvial, marine, estuarine, periglacial). Additionally, the offshore surface has been attached to the landward Top-Palaeogene surface and was transformed into a uniform 3D surface allowing new and better interpretations to be used in fundamental and applied research underpinning both scientific purposes (e.g. geology, archaeology, palaeogeography), and commercial applications (e.g. wind farms, aggregate extraction, dredging).
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A highly diverse micrososm in a hostile world: a review on the associates of red wood ants (Formica rufa group)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference À la recherche des meules romaines dans un paysage dépourvu de ressources lithiques. Premier bilan d'une analyse multidisciplinaire dans le Civitas Menapiorum (Belgique
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2016
Article Reference A land snail's view of a fragmented landscape
Habitat fragmentation may influence the genetic structure of populations, especially of species with low mobility. So far, these effects have been mainly studied by surveying neutral markers, and much less by looking at ecologically relevant characters. Therefore, we aimed to explore eventual patterns of covariation between population structuring in neutral markers and variation in shell morphometrics in the forest-associated snail Discus rotundatus in relation to habitat fragment characteristics. To this end, we screened shell morphometric variability and sequence variation in a fragment of the mitochondrial 16S rDNA gene in D. rotundatus from the fragmented landscape of the Lower Rhine Embayment, Germany. The 16S rDNA of D. rotundatus was highly variable, with a total of 118 haplotypes (384 individuals) forming four clades and one unresolved group. There was a geographic pattern in the distribution of the clades with the river Rhine apparently separating two groups. Yet, at the geographic scale considered, there was no obvious effect of fragmentation on shell morphometrics and 16S rDNA variation because G(ST) often was as high within, as between forests. Instead, the age of the habitat and (re-)afforestation events appeared to affect shell shape and 16S rDNA in terms of the number of clades per site. The ecologically relevant characters thus supported the presumably neutral mitochondrial DNA markers by indicating that populations of not strictly stenecious species may be (relatively) stable in fragments. However, afforestation after large clearcuts and habitat gain after the amendment of deforestation are accompanied by several, seemingly persistent peculiarities, such as altered genetic composition and shell characters (e.g. aperture size). (C) 2009 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2009, 98, 839-850.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Inbook Reference A Late Period fish deposit at Oxyrhynchus (el-Bahnasa, Egypt)
We describe the abundant faunal remains that were found in an extensive ritual deposit discovered in 2012 at Oxyrhynchus. This site in Middle Egypt has been famous since the first millennium BC for the mormyrid fish that were worshipped there and after which the town was named. The role played by these fish has already been amply documented through textual evidence, bronze statuettes and paintings, but until now, no remains and no mummies of these fish had been found. We first describe the ritual deposit as a whole, with emphasis on its extent, its stratigraphy and its relationship to the surrounding structures, which, together with a very specific artefact, allow the layers to be dated to the Late Period. The fish remains, as well as the sparse mammal bones, are quantified using both number of identified specimens (NISP) and minimum number of individuals (MNI). Body length reconstructions of the mormyrid fish are carried out using newly derived regression equations. Because of the large quantity of material, we performed the taxonomic identifications and size reconstructions on subsamples from which estimates were then made for the total number of fish that may have been present in the entire deposit. Attention was given to the way in which the fish bundles were prepared, a process that involved both the use of textiles and halfa grass, and to how the deposit was organised. We discuss the species spectrum in relation to both the Egyptian fish cult and evidence from written sources. Finally, we attempt to reconstruct the different events that may have taken place between the capture of the fish and their final deposition at the site, using a combination of both zoological/ecological and papyrological evidence.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2019
Article Reference A link between host dispersal and parasite diversity in two sympatric cichlids of Lake Tanganyika
1. A major goal in ecology is to unravel how species assemblages emerge and how they are structured across the landscape. Host–parasite systems are particularly interesting in this context, as limited host dispersal may promote the differentiation of parasite communities. 2. We examined whether the patterns of species diversity in Cichlidogyrus, a genus of monogenean parasitic flatworms with a direct life cycle, are consistent with the hypothesis that parasite diversity is driven by host dispersal. This was carried out by comparing two sympatric cichlid hosts (Tropheus moorii and Simochromis diagramma) with contrasting dispersal abilities. Genetic connectivity among host populations along the Zambian shoreline of Lake Tanganyika was estimated using microsatellite genotyping. Cichlidogyrus parasites were isolated and identified morphologically to the species level. 3.Simochromis diagramma, a host with a high dispersal capacity, was infected by a low number of Cichlidogyrus species, and the parasite assemblages were similar among host populations. In contrast, T. moorii, a host with a low dispersal capacity, was infected by a large number of Cichlidogyrus species, and the parasite assemblages differed strongly among host populations. These outcomes were thus as expected from the hypothesis. 4. Because of the strong host specificity of these Cichlidogyrus species, a lack of connectivity among host populations might facilitate allopatric speciation of the parasite.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A little-known German naturalist: Konrad Miller (1844-1933) and his malacological contributions
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2019
Article Reference A marine vertebrate fauna from the Toarcian-Aalenian succession of southern Beaujolais, Rhône, France.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A mesolithic case of odontoma ?
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2016
Article Reference A Middle Devonian Callixylon (Archaeopteridales) from Ronquières, Belgium
A permineralized Callixylon trunk is reported from Ronquières, a mid to late Givetian (Middle Devonian) locality from Belgium. The specimen consists of an 80 cm long trunk adpression whose central area is preserved as a pyrite permineralization. The pyritized area is composed of a eustele surrounded by secondary xylem. Tracheids show radially aligned groups of pits separated by unpitted regions on the radial walls of tracheids. The specimen belongs to a group of species characterized by a predominance of uniseriate rays and the lack of ray tracheids. This Callixylon specimen is one of the earliest representatives of the genus. It coexists at the locality with large cladoxylopsids and provides direct evidence that the tree habit had evolved in the archaeopteridalean progymnosperms by the Givetian.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications