Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

You are here: Home / Library / RBINS Staff Publications / New archaeozoological evidence for the introduction of the guinea pig to Europe

Fabienne Pigière, Wim Van Neer, Cécile Ansieau and Marceline Denis (2012)

New archaeozoological evidence for the introduction of the guinea pig to Europe

Journal of Archaeological Science, 39:1020-1024.

The remains are described of a guinea pig dated to the end of the 16th - beginning of the 17th c. AD. The animal was discovered at a site in Mons, Belgium, and is the first European archaeozoological find dated with certainty on the basis of both the archaeological context and a radiocarbon dating of its bone. This find confirms that the guinea pig was introduced to Europe soon after the conquest of South America. The morphological and metrical analyses performed on the skeletal remains are in agreement with the iconographic and literary sources indicating the domestic status of the animals imported to Europe. While a previous discovery in England suggested that the guinea pig was a prestigious animal, the present study argues that it was accessible to several classes of the population which may be related to the rapid spread of this prolific animal after its introduction in Europe.
Peer Review, International Redaction Board, Impact Factor
IF 2011 = 1,916
Related content
Earth and History of Life

Document Actions

Menu

 
RBINS Staff
add or import reference(s)
  • add a PDF paper
    (Please follow editors copyrights policies)
  • add a PDF poster