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You are here: Home / Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2018 / New data on the Early Eocene Mammals and other vertebrates from the Cambay Shale Formation exposed in Lignite Mines of Gujarat, Western India

Thierry Smith, Rajendra S. Rana, Kishor Kumar, Annelise Folie, Rachel Dunn, Floréal Solé, Shawn Zack and Kenneth D. Rose (2018)

New data on the Early Eocene Mammals and other vertebrates from the Cambay Shale Formation exposed in Lignite Mines of Gujarat, Western India

In: Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, 78th Annual Meeting Albuquerque; October 17-20; Meeting program and abstracts, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.

Excavations since 2004 in the early Eocene Cambay Shale Formation at Vastan, Mangrol, and Tadkeshwar open-cast lignite mines in Gujarat, western India, have yielded thousands of vertebrate specimens of terrestrial mammals, lizards, snakes, frogs, and birds as well as elasmobranch and teleost fishes. Here we report new fossils from the currently active Tadkeshwar mine discovered from several layers intercalated at different heights between the two major lignite seams. Most of them belong to taxa already described from the nearby Vastan and Mangrol mines, such as the adapoid primate Marcgodinotius indicus, the hyaenodontan Indohyaenodon raoi, the tillodont Anthraconyx hypsomylus, the perissodactyl-like mammal Cambaytherium thewissi, the agamid lizard Tinosaurus indicus, the palaeophiid snake Palaeophis vastaniensis, the caenophidian snakes Procerophis and Thaumastophis, and the bird Vastanavis. The presence of these taxa in the three mines and at different levels suggests that the deposits between the two major lignite seams represent a relatively short time span and a single mammal age. Among the new specimens from Tadkeshwar are well-preserved jaws of a new condylarth-like mammal, a new adapoid primate, and a small tapiroid perissodactyl. Most vertebrate taxa of the Cambay Shale Formation are of west European affinities; some of them seem to be endemic to India, and a few are of Gondwanan affinities, such as mesoeucrocodylians and the giant madtsoiid snake Platyspondylophis, attesting that the early Eocene was an important period in India during which Laurasian taxa coexisted with relict taxa from Gondwana before the India-Asia collision. Grant Information: Funded by Leakey Foundation, National Geographic Society, Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, and Belgian Science Policy Office (project BR/121/A3/PalEurAfrica)
Peer Review, International Redaction Board, Abstract of an Oral Presentation or a Poster
Paleontology

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