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Article Reference Detection of Bonobos (Pan Paniscus) in Tropical Rainforest Canopies Using Drone-Based Thermal Imaging: A First Step Towards Accurately Estimating Population Sizes?
Surveying great ape populations is time-consuming and costly, and often relies on generalised parameters, resulting in imprecise population estimates. Using thermal imaging, through thermal cameras fitted on unmanned aerial vehicles, to detect primates directly from the air, may prove a useful alternative to conventional great ape population surveys. This may be especially true for bonobos (Pan paniscus) which, due to their large body size and nesting behaviour, could provide a uniquely identifiable thermal signature. We trialled the use of a thermal drone to record bonobos in their natural environment in the Democratic Republic of Congo, as a first step towards using the technique to survey great apes. Bonobos were observed asleep in their nests during all surveys at different flight speeds and heights, showing potential for the use of thermal drones as a method to survey great apes.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2022
Article Reference Detection of Bonobos (Pan Paniscus) in Tropical Rainforest Canopies Using Drone-Based Thermal Imaging: A First Step Towards Accurately Estimating Population Sizes?
Surveying great ape populations is time-consuming and costly, and often relies on generalised parameters, resulting in imprecise population estimates. Using thermal imaging, through thermal cameras fitted on unmanned aerial vehicles, to detect primates directly from the air, may prove a useful alternative to conventional great ape population surveys. This may be especially true for bonobos (Pan paniscus) which, due to their large body size and nesting behaviour, could provide a uniquely identifiable thermal signature. We trialled the use of a thermal drone to record bonobos in their natural environment in the Democratic Republic of Congo, as a first step towards using the technique to survey great apes. Bonobos were observed asleep in their nests during all surveys at different flight speeds and heights, showing potential for the use of thermal drones as a method to survey great apes.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2022
Article Reference Untangling the waterfall damsels: a review of the Mesoamerican genus Paraphlebia Selys in Hagen, 1861 (Odonata: Thaumatoneuridae) with descriptions of 11 new species.
A review of the Mesoamerican genus Paraphlebia Selys in Hagen, 1861 is presented, including diagnoses, illustrations of diagnostic characters, and distribution maps for all species. A key to the known males and females is provided. Eleven new species are described: P. akan Ortega-Salas & González-Soriano. sp. nov., P. chaak Ortega-Salas & González-Soriano sp. nov., P. chiarae Ortega-Salas sp. nov., P. esperanza Ortega-Salas & González-Soriano sp. nov., P. flinti Ortega-Salas & González-Soriano sp. nov., P. hunnal Ortega-Salas & González-Soriano sp. nov., P. itzamna Ortega-Salas, Jocque & González-Soriano sp. nov., P. ixchel Ortega-Salas & González-Soriano sp. nov., P. kauil Ortega-Salas & González-Soriano sp. nov., P. kinich Ortega-Salas & González-Soriano sp. nov., and P. kukulkan Jocque & Ortega-Salas sp. nov.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2022
Article Reference Dragonflies of Cusuco National Park, Honduras; checklist, new country records and the description of a new species of Palaemnema Selys, 1860 (Odonata: Platystictidae)
The odonate fauna of Honduras is poorly documented. Based on 10 years of observations and collections we present an overview of dragonflies from cloud forests in Cusuco National Park, northwestern Honduras. A total of 44 species were reported including at least seven new country records for Honduras we include ecological observations for most species. A new species of Platystictidae (Palaemnema lorae Jocque & Garrison, n. sp. Holotype ♂: HONDURAS: Cortés Dept., CNP, Cantiles, Trail 5, small river close to camp, N15.513457 W88.241681; 1846m, 23 June 2012 collected by Merlijn Jocque, field code: BINCO_HON_12_047, in RBINS) is described and illustrated.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2022
Article Reference Earth sciences at the centre of the energy transition
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2023
Article Reference Bird bones from Trou de Chaleux and the human exploitation of birds during the late Magdalenian in Belgium
The Trou de Chaleux is a cave site located in Belgium. It delivered a rich late Magdalenian material culture constituted mainly of lithic artefacts but also including bone industries and figurative art. This paper presents the results of the analysis of the large collection of bird remains recovered by E. Dupont in 1865, which was yet unstudied from taphonomical and archaeozoological perspectives. In addition to the taxonomic identification, surface alterations were investigated based on a macro- and microscopic analysis, including an analysis of wear traces and elementary composition. Special attention is devoted to the presence of human modifications such as disarticulation or butchering marks, traces of heating, presence of colourants and traces of bone working. The taphonomic history of the bird assemblage is reconstructed and the use of birds by humans characterized, as well as their importance in past human activities. We also discuss evidence for seasonal exploitation and for reconstructing the local environment and integrate our results with evidence from other Magdalenian assemblages from north-western Europe. At Trou de Chaleux, birds were used for food, as raw material for bone working and for symbolic purposes. The exploitation of avian products was intense, and species have been used for several purposes such as the raven and snowy owl having been exploited both for food and for symbolic reasons. Large bird bones were used as raw material to produce artefacts, but the use-wear analysis did not evidence unambiguous traces related to the use of the objects produced. Despite several limiting factors, the bird material from Trou de Chaleux considerably increases the knowledge of past human exploitation of birds during the late Magdalenian in north-western Europe.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Article Reference First record of the terrestrial nemertean Geonemertes pelaensis Semper, 1863 (Hoplonemertea: Prosorhochmidae) for Cuba
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2020
Inbook Reference A Late Period fish deposit at Oxyrhynchus (el-Bahnasa, Egypt)
We describe the abundant faunal remains that were found in an extensive ritual deposit discovered in 2012 at Oxyrhynchus. This site in Middle Egypt has been famous since the first millennium BC for the mormyrid fish that were worshipped there and after which the town was named. The role played by these fish has already been amply documented through textual evidence, bronze statuettes and paintings, but until now, no remains and no mummies of these fish had been found. We first describe the ritual deposit as a whole, with emphasis on its extent, its stratigraphy and its relationship to the surrounding structures, which, together with a very specific artefact, allow the layers to be dated to the Late Period. The fish remains, as well as the sparse mammal bones, are quantified using both number of identified specimens (NISP) and minimum number of individuals (MNI). Body length reconstructions of the mormyrid fish are carried out using newly derived regression equations. Because of the large quantity of material, we performed the taxonomic identifications and size reconstructions on subsamples from which estimates were then made for the total number of fish that may have been present in the entire deposit. Attention was given to the way in which the fish bundles were prepared, a process that involved both the use of textiles and halfa grass, and to how the deposit was organised. We discuss the species spectrum in relation to both the Egyptian fish cult and evidence from written sources. Finally, we attempt to reconstruct the different events that may have taken place between the capture of the fish and their final deposition at the site, using a combination of both zoological/ecological and papyrological evidence.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2019
Article Reference A checklist of Lecithoceridae (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea) of the Afrotropical Region
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2021
Incollection Reference Archaeobotanical Studies from Hierakonpolis: Evidence for Food Processing During the Predynastic Period in Egypt
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2018