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Inproceedings Reference Multi-class floc size distributions of cohesive sediments in the turbidity maximum of Chagjiang River mouth
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2019
Inproceedings Reference New approaches to sand resource management - in a constrained environment
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2019
Inproceedings Reference From seabed mapping to geo-environmental knowledge base, a pathway towards a more sustainable resource management
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2019
Inproceedings Reference Finding the data you need to support your Southern Ocean science
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2018
Inproceedings Reference Comparison of spatial genetic structure and its drivers in Arctic and Antarctic fishes
Marine populations are genetically structured through historical processes, environmental or physical barriers and life history characteristics. Divergent patterns of demographic history, even among closely-related species sharing climatic changes, raise questions about the influence of species-specific traits on population structure. The Southern Ocean features comparatively high biodiversity, which has been attributed to frequent local extinction-recolonization cycles that have driven benthic, Antarctic organisms into temporary refugia. In contrast, organisms in the Arctic were able to shift latitude in response to changing Pleistocene climate. We therefore hypothesize that Arctic populations were historically less constrained in their distribution than Antarctic fish populations and hence show lower levels of genetic structure. For assessing the role of lifestyle in influencing demographic history in the Southern Ocean closely related notothenioid fish with benthic (Trematomus bernacchii, T. hansoni) and semi-pelagic or even cryopelagic (T. newnesi) lifestyles were genetically analysed. In the Arctic, polar cod (Boreogadus saida), which is often found in association with sea ice, but also throughout the water column to the bottom, can be regarded as semi- or cryopelagic too. The Antarctic species were analysed by six microsatellite and one mitochondrial marker before (Van de Putte et al., 2012) and we extend these analyses with data from nine microsatellite markers in polar cod. Antarctic species showed significant genetic population structure between High-Antarctic and Peninsular regions and much lower differentiation in pelagic than benthic species. It suggests that the observed patterns are indeed related to ecological traits of Antarctic fish. In the Arctic, we hypothesize genetic structuring inside fjords in Svalbard relative to shelf specimens, which we expect to show low or absent structure as in Antarctic species with a similar lifestyle. Identifying common driving factors for population structure is important in order to enable forecasting, particularly in light of dramatically increasing rates of environmental change. Comparing population genetic patterns and exploring underlying causes from both poles may thus help to shed light on how fish populations survived in the past and may persist in the future. Reference - Van de Putte A., Janko K., Kasparova E., Maes G.E., Rock, J., Koubbi P., Volckaert F.A.M., Choleva L., Fraser K.P.P., Smykla J., Van Houdt J.K.J., Marshall C. 2012 Comparative phylogegraphy of three trematomid fishes reveals contrasting genetic structure patterns in benthic and pelagic species. Marine Genomics 8:23-34.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2018
Inproceedings Reference The origin and population structure of introduced Nile tilapia populations in Central Africa
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2018
Misc Reference Integrative species delimitation and phylogeny of the branchiate worm Branchiodrilus (Clitellata, Naididae)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2018
Misc Reference DNA barcoding and diversity of groundwater oligochaetes in the Ouémé basin, Benin, West Africa
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2018
Unpublished Reference Project RAVen: Validating radar technologies to study near- and offshore bird migration
The Belgian part of the North Sea is part of a very important seabird migration route through the Southern North Sea, which makes it an ideal area to study bird migration. Because of its shape, this part of the North Sea acts as a migration bottleneck, concentrating birds during migration. This study aims at cross-validating bird detection by meteorological and bird radars, mainly focusing on offshore and coastal migration, and suggesting refinements to the bird detection algorithms of both weather and dedicated bird radars. The Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium (RMI) uses three C-band weather radars for meteorological observations, one of which is located in Jabbeke, at only a few kilometers from the Belgian coast. The Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (RBINS) has installed a Merlin bird radar (DeTect Inc.) on an offshore platform at 25km from the coast, to study the impact of offshore wind farms. The Merlin radar system consists of two identical radar antennas, one scanning in the horizontal pane and one in the vertical. They are operating at a range of 7.4km and 1.85km respectively, thus providing high resolution data. The measurements of the bird radar and the weather radar in Jabbeke are overlapping, which offers a unique situation to cross-validate the data of both types of radar and to extrapolate the high resolution data of the bird radar to the wider spatial scale of the weather radar. RBINS and RMI are joining forces in a two year project called RAVen (RAdar registrations of bird migration Validation through an interdisciplinary approach). It runs until mid-September 2018 and is funded by the Belgian Science Policy. First results (from spring 2016) already show a good correlation between the number of birds detected by both radars.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2017
Unpublished Reference Comparing the results of four widely used automated bat identification software programs in the North Sea region
Recently a few papers were published addressing the prudency needed when using automated identification software programs to analyse recordings of bat echolocation sounds. We want to contribute to that discussion by analysing a reference dataset of bat recordings with four widely used and commercially available software programs (BatIdent, BatExplorer, Kaleidoscope and Sonochiro). The reference data were all recorded in Western-Europe with a batcorder. For most of the recordings there was a visual confirmation of the recorded species. In a few other cases certainty was obtained because the specimens were captured and released or because the recordings were made in certain areas which were outside of the range of other species (e.g. at high altitude to separate Eptesicus serotinus and Eptesicus nilssonii). After running the different programs on the reference data, we compared the outputted results. Overall, identification of the recordings to species level in this test was best with Batident (81% correct identifications), followed by Kaleidoscope (71%), Sonochiro (63%) and BatExplorer (53%). We can conclude that each of the tested programs has its own strengths and weaknesses, but none of them should be used unsupervised. Outputted results need to be checked by a trained expert. In this way, our test affirms the conclusions of previous tests in Northern Europe and the USA.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications 2017