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Article Reference Le « Coticule » de Vielsalm et Lierneux (Belgique) : une pierre à aiguiser au passé mondial
The coticule is an Ordovician aged metamorphic rock only present in the southern part of the Stavelot Massif on the towns of Vielsam and Lierneux. It comes in centimeter thick layers consisting in micrometric crystals of spessartite, microphyllites of micas, infra micrometer quartz. Its exceptional sharpening properties of the metal (razor sharp thin, sharp broad, sharp curve) gave its reputation of a natural abrasive stone and a global distribution (barber, circumciser, surgeon, butcher, carpenter, cabinetmaker, arborist, gardener, winemaker, tanner, coachbuilder ...). Exploited and shaped since the 16th century, the coticule was exported as a whetstone (aka razor stone), the "bouts belges" and to special forms. It was operated by craftsmen, primarily from the surface in open pits, in trenches and then by underground galleries, following the evolution of mining techniques of lighting and drainage. The material was sawn, made in standard sizes and polished by the quarry workers and then in small workshops. The high number of models, the various manufacturing steps entirely manual, the low yield (2-5%), competition from synthetic stones, and the disappearance of part of the customer after the Second World War sounded the death knell of this unique activity. Located in Lierneux, a quarry still operates today the coticule and most of its production is exported to the United States of America. The old mining galleries are today the winter refuge of bats populations. They are considered as cavities of scientific interest. Finally, the Museum of the coticule in Salmchâteau (Vielsalm) presents this manufacturing industry with a global destiny.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Inproceedings Reference Le site Bas-Empire de Baelen/Nereth, province de Liège. Un établissement germanique dans l’est de la Wallonie.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Habitats du Néolithique ancien en Hainaut occidental (Ath et Beloeil, Belgique) : Ormeignies « Le Pilori » et Aubechies « Coron Maton ».
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference L’établissement germanique du Bas-Empire à Baelen/Nereth, province de Liège (Belgique).
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Baelen, province of Liege, Belgium: A Germanic Settlement in Late Antique northern Gaule
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Unpublished Reference L'altération des briquets en «marcassite» du «Trou de Chaleux» (Fouilles d’Édouard Dupond) : identification de phases minérales primaires et secondaires
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Proceedings Reference Rare Earth Elements and Sr-Isotopic Geochemistry: Tools to Determinate the Geological and Geographical Origins of Neolithic Fluorites [S14]
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference The cost of CO2 geological storage is more than a number
CO2 geological storage is the last stage in the CO2 capture and storage process which aims to reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. The cost of storage has frequently been regarded as minor compared to the cost of the whole CCS process. There are however a multitude of cost parameters that will form a unique combination for each storage project, with costs projected from one to several tens of euros per tonne of CO2 stored. Several research efforts have lately been identifying the main cost drivers and relatively wide cost ranges. Reservoir type and location, geological uncertainty, injectivity and capacity are recognised as the main source of cost variation between potential storage projects.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Inproceedings Reference CCS Directive transposition into national laws in Europe: progress and problems by the end of 2011
The EU CCS Directive transposition process and related issues in 26 European countries, comprising 24 EU member states, Norway and Croatia were studied in the EU FP7 project: “CGS Europe” in 2011-2012. By the end of 2011 the transposition of the Directive into national law had been approved by the European Commission (EC) in Spain only, but had been approved at national/jurisdictional level in 12 other countries (Austria, Denmark, Estonia, France, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Slovakia and Sweden) and two regions of Belgium. By January 2012, the European Commission had assessed and approved national submissions of CCS legal acts transposing the Directive in Denmark, France, Italy, Lithuania, Malta, the Netherlands and Slovenia. Implementation in the UK was completed in February 2012 and by end March 2012, implementation at national level was also complete in Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Portugal and Romania.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Proceedings Reference Did a major environmental event lead to the Late Bronze Age abandonment of the ancient harbor city of Hala Sultan Tekke? Unraveling the sedimentary record of the Larnaca salt lake, Cyprus.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications