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Incollection Reference Termites in Santo: lessons from a survey in Penaoru area.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Incollection Reference Nutrient recycling starts in the canopy: the secretive action of termites.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Incollection Reference Challenges and solutions for planning and implementing large-scale biotic inventories
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference On Scottish sawflies , with results of the 14 th International Sawfly Workshop , in the southern Highlands , 2010
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A reassessment of the fossil goose Anser scaldii Lambrecht, 1933
The name Anser scaldii was first used by Van Beneden (1872) in a brief text that read ‘Nous avons recu un humérus dans un parfait état de conservation, trouvé dans le crag, à Anvers’. The name was also used by Van Beneden (1873), but in both instances it is a nomen nudum. The name was made valid for the purposes of nomenclature by Lambrecht (1933: 368) when he entered Anser scaldii Van Beneden, 1872, with the following description and information: ‘Humerus typisch anserin, von der Größe von Tadorna casarca. Länge 129 mm. Material: Humerus im Mus. Bruxelles. Alter und Fundort: Obermiozän (Bolderian), Antwerpen. Etymologie: Artname nach der Schelde: Scaldia.’ At the same time he mistakenly gave the original combination as Anas scaldii Van Beneden 1872, which error was perpetuated by Gaillard (1939), Brodkorb (1964), Howard (1964), and Bochenski (1997), as noted by Mlíkovský (2002: 125). The statement by Lambrecht that this fossil is of similar length to humeri of Tadorna prompted Worthy et al. (2007) to suggest that Anser scaldii may have a bearing on the evolution of Tadornini in Europe. Accordingly, we re- examined the holotype in the Department of Paleontology, Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Brussels, Belgium, to ascertain its relationships and its significance in Anseriform evolution.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A complete skull of Allodaposuchus precedens Nopcsa, 1928 (Eusuchia) and a reassessment of the morphology of the taxon based on the romanian remains
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A new adappoid primate from the Early Eocene of India
A new genus and species of primitive adapoid primate, Asiadapis cambayensis, is described based on a dentary from the lower Eocene Cambay Shale exposed in the Vastan lignite mine in Gujarat, western India. Asiadapis is most similar to European cercamoniine notharctids and to Marcgodinotius, another primitive cercamoniine from Vastan mine. Asiadapis and Marcgodinotius may belong to a primitive clade of notharctids that reached India around the beginning of the Eocene.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Repeated unidirectional introgression of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA between four congeneric Tanganyikan cichlids.
With an increasing number of reported cases of hybridization and introgression, interspecific gene flow between animals has recently become a widely accepted and broadly studied phenomenon. In this study, we examine patterns of hybridization and introgression in Ophthalmotilapia spp., a genus of cichlid fish from Lake Tanganyika, using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from all four species in the genus and including specimens from over 800 km of shoreline. These four species have very different, partially overlapping distribution ranges, thus allowing us to study in detail patterns of gene flow between sympatric and allopatric populations of the different species. We show that a significant proportion of individuals of the lake-wide distributed O. nasuta carry mitochondrial and/or nuclear DNA typical of other Ophthalmotilapia species. Strikingly, all such individuals were found in populations living in sympatry with each of the other Ophthalmotilapia species, strongly suggesting that this pattern originated by repeated and independent episodes of genetic exchange in different parts of the lake, with unidirectional introgression occurring into O. nasuta. Our analysis rejects the hypotheses that unidirectional introgression is caused by natural selection favoring heterospecific DNA, by skewed abundances of Ophthalmotilapia species or by hybridization events occurring during a putative spatial expansion in O. nasuta. Instead, cytonuclear incompatibilities or asymmetric behavioral reproductive isolation seem to have driven repeated, unidirectional introgression of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA into O. nasuta in different parts of the lake.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A mitochondrial phylogeographic scenario for the most widespread African rodent species , Mastomys natalensis
In order to evaluate the contribution of geological, environmental, and climatic changes to the spatial distri- bution of genetic variation of Mastomys natalensis, we analysed cytochrome b sequences from the whole dis- tribution area of the species to infer its phylogeographic structure and historical demography. Six well-supported phylogroups, differentiated during the Pleistocene, were evidenced. No significant correlation between genetic and geographic distances was found at the continental scale, and the geographic distributions of the observed phylogroups have resulted from extensive periods of isolation caused by the presence of putative geographic and ecological barriers. The diversification events were probably influenced by habitat contraction/expansion cycles that may have complemented topographic barriers to induce genetic drift and lineage sorting. According to our results, we propose a scenario where climate-driven processes may have played a primary role in the differ- entiation among phylogroups.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Establishment of ant communities in forests growing on former agricultural fields: Colonisation and 25 years of management are not enough (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications