Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

You are here: Home
3072 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type



































New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Article Reference High diversity of acrodontan lizards in the Early Eocene Vastan Lignite Mine of India
The Ypresian Cambay Formation at Vastan Mine in Gujarat, western India, has yielded a rich herpetological fauna including snakes, lizards and amphibians, but strangely, lizards are only represented by Acrodonta. Here we describe the acrodontan assemblage based on numerous, diverse and well-preserved dentaries, premaxillae, and maxillae. Among the five taxa described one new genus and species characterised by a short splenial represents the youngest occurrence of the extinct family Priscagamidae. The other four taxa belong to the extant family Agamidae. Two of them previously known, Vastanagama susanae and Tinosaurus indicus, are here revised. The two other taxa are new. The first one, Suratagama neeraae gen. and sp. nov., is characterised by the presence of six small pleurodont teeth with a nearly cylindrical shaft and an obtusely pointed apex. The second one, Indiagama gujarata gen. and sp. nov., has rectangular teeth in lateral view, unicuspid crowns forming a nearly horizontal cutting edge, and wear facets on both the lingual and labial sides of the dentary. Our results confirm that Acrodonta is the only lizard group present in Vastan, whereas many other groups are already present from the beginning of the Early Eocene on the other continents. The diversity of the agamids in Vastan and the absence of non-acrodontan lizard in India tentatively support the Out-of-India hypothesis for agamids.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Encounter competition partly explains the segregation of the sandy beach amphipods Bathyporeia pilosa and Bathyporeia sarsi. A mecocosm experiment.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference The role of structuring benthos for juvenile flatfish.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Monitoring and evaluation of spatially managed areas: A generic framework for implementation of ecosystem based marine management and its application.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference The Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus) as a Predator of Harbour Porpoises (Phocoena phocoena)?
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Diurnal variability of turbidity and light attenuation in the southern North Sea from the SEVIRI geostationary sensor.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference In situ evidence of non-zero reflectance in the OLCI 1020 nm band for a turbid estuary.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Influence of suspended particle concentration, composition and size on the variability of inherent optical properties of the Southern North Sea.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Suggested guidelines for invasive sampling of hominid remains
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Octet Stream The position of the Nazlet Khater specimen among prehistoric and modern African and Levantine populations
The morphometric affinities of the 33,000 year old skeleton from Nazlet Khater, Upper Egypt are examined using multivariate statistical procedures. In the first part, principal components analysis is performed on a dataset of mandible dimensions of 220 fossils, sub-fossils and modern specimens, ranging in time from the Late Pleistocene to recent and restricted in space to the African continent and Southern Levant. In the second part, mean measurements for various prehistoric and modern African and Levantine populations are incorporated in the statistical analysis. Subsequently, differences between male and female means are examined for some of the modern and prehistoric populations. The results indicate a strong association between some of the sub-Saharan Middle Stone Age (MSA) specimens, and the Nazlet Khater mandible. Furthermore, the results suggest that variability between African populations during the Neolithic and Protohistoric periods was more pronounced than the range of variability observed among recent African and Levantine populations. Results also demonstrate a general reduction in the degree of sexual dimorphism during the Holocene. However, this pattern of reduction pattern varies by geographic location and is not uniform across the African continent.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications