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Article Reference A second remarkable slug and a thin-shelled Trochonanina snail from the Udzungwa Mountains, Tanzania (Stylommatophora: Helicarionoidea: Urocyclidae)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Monitoring micropollutants in marine waters, can quality standards be met ?
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A Comprehensive Molecular Phylogeny of Dalytyphloplanida (Platyhelminthes: Rhabdocoela) Reveals Multiple Escapes from the Marine Environment and Origins of Symbiotic Relationships
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Organ- and species-specific accumulation of metals in two land snail species (Gastropoda, Pulmonata)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Oxychilus (Drouetia) viridescens (Gastropoda: Pulmonata: Oxychilidae), a new species from Santa Maria, Açores, and a review of the subgenus
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Temperature, salinity and growth rate dependences of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of the skeleton of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck): an experimental approach
The skeletal Mg/Ca ratio of echinoderms is known to increase with temperature but the relation has never been established in controlled experimental conditions. The present study investigated the eVect of temperature, salinity and growth rate on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in calcite skeletons of juvenile sea urchins grown in experimental conditions. Mg/Ca ratio was positively related to temperature, increasing until a plateau at high but Weld occurring temperatures. It was not linked to salinity nor growth rate. We suggest that this plateau is due to properties of the organic matrix of mineralization and recommend to take it into account for the use of Mg/Ca as proxy of seawater Mg/Ca. Skeletal Sr/Ca ratio was mainly dependent on temperature and growth rate, as usually observed in calcite skeletons.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Five New Species of Homoscleromorpha (Porifera) from the Caribbean Sea
Five new species of Homoscleromorpha (Porifera) of four genera, Oscarella, Plakortis, Plakina and Corticium, are described from vertical walls of reef caves at depths ranging from 23 to 28 m in the Caribbean Sea. Oscarella nathaliae sp. nov. has a leaf-like thinly encrusting, flat body, loosely attached to the substrate and a perforated, not lobate surface. Oscarella nathaliae sp. nov. contains two bacterial morphotypes and is characterized by two mesohylar cell types with inclusions. Plakortis myrae sp. nov. has diods of two categories: abundant large ones (83–119 mm long) and rare small ones (67–71 mm long) with sinuous, S-bent centres; triods Y- or T-shaped (18–5 mm long), and abundant microrhabds (5–12 mm long). Plakortis edwardsi sp. nov. has diods of one category with thick, sinuous, S-bent centres (110 to 128 mm long); triods T-shaped (actines 28–59 mm long). It is the only species of this genus showing small diods (22–31 mm long). Plakortis dariae sp. nov. has diods of two categories: large ones (67–112 mm long) and small, rare, irregular ones, slightly curved, often deformed with one end blunt (30–59 mm long); triods rare and regular (actines 20–44 mm long long). Corticium diamantense sp. nov. has oscula situated near its border, regular non-lophose calthrops of one size class, very rare tetralophose calthrops and candelabra with the fourth actine ramified basally in 4–5 microspined rays. In addition, a re-description of Plakina jamaicensis Lehnert & van Soest 1998 is based on newly collected material and the type specimen. P. jamaicensis has a convoluted brainlike surface; well developed sub-ectosomal cavities; irregular sinuous diods, triods, calthrops, rare monolophose calthrops, rare dilophose calthrops, rare trilophose calthrops and common tetralophose calthrops. Molecular ‘barcoding’ sequences for mitochondrial cob are given for Plakortis edwardsi sp. nov., P. dariae sp. nov., Plakina jamaicensis and Corticium diamantense sp. nov. An identification key for all western Atlantic Homoscleromorpha is provided.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Octet Stream Towards a List of Available Names in Zoology , partim Phylum Rotifera
Many, mostly older, names of animal species are nomenclaturally problematic, either because their orthography is unstable, or they cannot be linked reliably to a taxonomic identity, due to the lack of recognisable descriptions and/or types. Yet, they represent available (sensu International Code of Zoological Nomenclature) names and must be taken into account in zoological works. This situation, with available senior, yet dubious names confounding nomenclature, is undesirable. It creates uncertainties at a time when molecular approaches are revolutionizing our concepts of species diversity, and fails us when the current extinction crisis calls for efficient, accurate, and constructive approaches to document, monitor, and conserve biodiversity. The International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (The Code) provides a means to address this issue by restricting availability, application and orthography of names to those included in the List of Available Names in Zoology (LAN). The Code (Art. 79) allows an international body of zoologists in consultation with the Commission to propose a candidate part of the LAN for a major taxonomic field. We explore this possibility for 3570 species-group names of Phylum Rotifera (of which 665 are problematic), by presenting such a candidate Rotifera part of the LAN. The web site of the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (http://www.iczn.org) will hold both the candidate list and a forum to facilitate consultation on the candidate list, while the list itself also can already be freely downloaded from three other Internet sites: http://fada.biodiversity.be, http://rotifer.ansp.org/LAN, and www.hausdernatur.at/rotifera. We give here an overview of the general approach and procedures applied in preparation of the candidate list, and anticipate that our effort will promote the process as well as result in a standard list of names for use in taxonomy, the Global Names Architecture and other biodiversity information initiatives.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference The ‘rotiferologist’ effect and other global correlates of species richness in monogonont rotifers
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference New species in the Old World: Europe as a frontier in biodiversity exploration, a test bed for 21st century taxonomy.
The number of described species on the planet is about 1.9 million, with ca. 17,000 new species described annually, mostly from the tropics. However, taxonomy is usually described as a science in crisis, lacking manpower and funding, a politically acknowledged problem known as the Taxonomic Impediment. Using data from the Fauna Europaea database and the Zoological Record, we show that contrary to general belief, developed and heavily-studied parts of the world are important reservoirs of unknown species. In Europe, new species of multicellular terrestrial and freshwater animals are being discovered and named at an unprecedented rate: since the 1950s, more than 770 new species are on average described each year from Europe, which add to the 125,000 terrestrial and freshwater multicellular species already known in this region. There is no sign of having reached a plateau that would allow for the assessment of the magnitude of European biodiversity. More remarkably, over 60\% of these new species are described by non-professional taxonomists. Amateurs are recognized as an essential part of the workforce in ecology and astronomy, but the magnitude of non-professional taxonomist contributions to alpha-taxonomy has not been fully realized until now. Our results stress the importance of developing a system that better supports and guides this formidable workforce, as we seek to overcome the Taxonomic Impediment and speed up the process of describing the planetary biodiversity before it is too late.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications