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Article Reference Dental and tarsal morphology of the European Paleocene/Eocene "condylarth" mammal Microhyus
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A new scincomorph lizard from the Paleocene of Belgium and the origin of the Scincoidea in Europe
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Anatomy and phylogeny of the gavialoid crocodylian Eosuchus lerichei from the Paleocene of Europe
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Paleocene-Eocene carbon isoltope excursion in organic carbon and pedogenic carbonate: direct comparision in a continental stratigraphic section
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference The in situ Glyptostroboxylon forest of Hoegaarden (Belgium) at the Initial Eocene Thermal Maximum (55 Ma)
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Where do adaptive shifts occur during invasion? A multidisciplinary approach to unravelling cold adaptation in a tropical ant species invading the Mediterranean area
Evolution may improve the invasiveness of populations, but it often remains unclear whether key adaptation events occur after introduction into the recipient habitat (i.e. post-introduction adaptation scenario), or before introduction within the native range (i.e. prior-adaptation scenario) or at a primary site of invasion (i.e. bridgehead scenario). We used a multidisciplinary approach to determine which of these three scenarios underlies the invasion of the tropical ant Wasmannia auropunctata in a Mediterranean region (i.e. Israel). Species distribution models (SDM), phylogeographical analyses at a broad geographical scale and laboratory experiments on appropriate native and invasive populations indicated that Israeli populations followed an invasion scenario in which adaptation to cold occurred at the southern limit of the native range before dispersal to Israel. We discuss the usefulness of combining SDM, genetic and experimental approaches for unambiguous determination of eco-evolutionary invasion scenarios.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference The Ecology and Feeding Habits of the Arboreal Trap-Jawed Ant Daceton armigerum
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Soil properties only weakly affect subterranean ant distribution at small spatial scales
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Arthropod diversity in a tropical forest
Most eukaryotic organisms are arthropods. Yet, their diversity in rich terrestrial ecosystems is still unknown. Here we produce tangible estimates of the total species richness of arthropods in a tropical rainforest. Using a comprehensive range of structured protocols, we sampled the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa from the soil to the forest canopy in the San Lorenzo forest, Panama. We collected 6144 arthropod species from 0.48 hectare and extrapolated total species richness to larger areas on the basis of competing models. The whole 6000-hectare forest reserve most likely sustains 25,000 arthropod species. Notably, just 1 hectare of rainforest yields 60\% of the arthropod biodiversity held in the wider landscape. Models based on plant diversity fitted the accumulated species richness of both herbivore and nonherbivore taxa exceptionally well. This lends credence to global estimates of arthropod biodiversity developed from plant models.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Parallel phenotypic evolution in a wolf spider radiation on Galápagos.
Within island archipelagos, repeated ecological settings may lead to radiations wherein similar niches are recurrently occupied. Although it has been shown that species with common habitat requirements share particular traits, it remains relatively unexplored to what extent this may lead to the repeated evolution of almost identical phenotypes (phenocopies) and how this correlates with traits subjected to sexual selection. Exploring divergence patterns of ecological and sexual relevant traits within spiders seem promising to enhance our understanding of the relative role of natural and sexual selection. Here, we conduct a detailed morphological analysis on a large set of genital and non-genital traits (morphometrics, colour pattern) within a radiation of the wolf spider genus Hogna Simon, 1885 on Galápagos and interpret these data, taking into account their known phylogenetic relationship. Our results show that recurrent environmental gradients have led to the parallel evolution of almost identical phenotypes, which not only proves that natural selection has driven morphological divergence, but also suggests that a similar genetic or developmental basis most likely underlies this divergence. Among-species variation in genital traits in contrast rather reflects the phylogenetic relationships on Santa Cruz and San Cristóbal. The combination of these data indicate that speciation in this system is driven by the combined effect of ecological mechanisms and allopatric divergence in sexual traits.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications