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Article Reference Geomorphological features in the area of Abu Habbah and Tell ed Der.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference The fluvial system between Tell ed-Der and Tell Abû Habbah.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference L'extension de la Formation d'Herzeele en Belgique
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference A Middle to late Holocene avulsion history of the Euphrates river: a case study from Tell ed-Der, Iraq, Lower Mesopotamia.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Aperçu de différentes méthodes d’analyse en matière d’estimation de l’âge sur le plan odontologique en médecine légale.
L’organe dentaire résiste pendant des siècles aux agressions physico-chimiques à tel point qu’il présente un intérêt majeur sur le plan médico-légal pour ce qui a trait à l’estimation de l’âge d’un individu décédé. Toute estimation de l’âge, que ce soit pour un être vivant ou pour une personne décédée s’effectue en corrélation avec les paramètres relevant d’autres disciplines, telles la médecine légale et l’anthropologie. Sur le plan dentaire les méthodes utilisées vont s’adapter aux différentes étapes jalonnant l’existence : la période foetale, la naissance, l’enfance, la période pubertaire, l’âge adulte. Un aperçu (non exhaustif) de différentes méthodes est décrit et commenté dans le présent article.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Interpreting the expansion of sea fishing in medieval Europe using stable isotope analysis of archaeological cod bones
Archaeological fish bones reveal increases in marine fish utilisation in Northern and Western Europe beginning in the 10th and 11th centuries AD. We use stable isotope signatures from 300 archaeological cod (Gadus morhua) bones to determine whether this sea fishing revolution resulted from increased local fishing or the introduction of preserved fish transported from distant waters such as Arctic Norway, Iceland and/or the Northern Isles of Scotland (Orkney and Shetland). Results from 12 settlements in England and Flanders (Belgium) indicate that catches were initially local. Between the 9th and 12th centuries most bones represented fish from the southern North Sea. Conversely, by the 13th to 14th centuries demand was increasingly met through long distance transport e signalling the onset of the globalisation of commercial fisheries and suggesting that cities such as London quickly outgrew the capacity of local fish supplies.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Animal dung from arid environments and archaeobotanical methodologies for its analysis: An example from animal burials of the Predynastic elite cemetery HK6 at Hierakonpolis, Egypt
Bioarchaeological studies of animal dung from arid environments provide valuable information on various aspects of life in ancient societies relating to land use and environmental change, and from the Neolithic onwards to the animal husbandry and the use of animals as markers of status and wealth. In this study we present the archaeobotanical analysis of animal gut contents from burials in the elite Predynastic cemetery HK6 at Hierakonpolis, Upper Egypt. The study involved analysis of plant macrofossils, phytoliths and pollen applied on samples from two elephants, a hartebeest, an aurochs and five domestic cattle. The study showed that most probably the elephants were given fodder containing emmer spikelets (dehusking by-products) before the animals death. Most of the other animals were also foddered with cereal chaff, but were mainly allowed to browse and graze in the settlement area and near the Nile. The diet of some contained only wild growing plants. The variety of plant remains identified in the stomach contents indicates that the food plants for the animals were obtained from three possible habitats near the site: the river banks, the low desert and the cultivated/anthropogenically modified areas.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Oxyarietites boletzkyi n.gen., n.sp., nouveau genre et nouvelle espèce d’ammonite dans le Sinémurien inférieur de Bourgogne (France) : un rare précurseur des morphologies oxycônes pour le Jurassique.
L’une des toutes premières ammonites à coquille presque oxycône observée dans les séries fossilifères après la crise faunique de la limite Trias/Jurassique est décrite. Elle provient du Sinémurien inférieur (chronozone à Semicostatum ou à Turneri) de Bourgogne (Mavilly-Mandelot, Côte-d’Or, France). Cette nouvelle forme, Oxyarietites boletzkyi n. gen., n. sp., possède une coquille involute, comprimée et carénée dont le type clairement suboxycône est nouveau pour le Sinémurien inférieur. En raison de son aire ventrale carénée, ce taxon se rattache probablement à la super-famille des Arietitoidea Hyatt, 1875 sensu Guex (1995) mais son attribution familiale est incertaine et son origine évolutive reste énigmatique. Outre son intérêt taxonomique, cette découverte est importante car elle pose le problème de la valeur adaptative des caractères liés à la géométrie des coquilles d’ammonites. Il est actuellement admis que les coquilles involutes, comprimées et carénées de type suboxycône et oxycône favorisent significativement l’hydrodynamisme et donc la mobilité des espèces qui les possèdent. Il est surprenant que l’acquisition de ce probable avantage adaptatif n’ait pas favorisé l’implantation au sein des peuplements du nouveau taxon, qui reste une forme rare. Dans tous les cas, la découverte d’O. boletzkyi n. gen., n. sp. rajeunit d’environ 2 millions d’années la mise en place des morphologies oxycônes au cours de la phase de reconstitution de la biodiversité post-crise Trias/Jurassique. Oxyarietites boletzkyi n.gen., n. sp., a new genus and species of ammonite for the Lower Sinemurian of Burgundy (France): a rare forerunner of the oxycone morpho­logies for the Jurassic. One of the very first quasi-oxycone ammonites following the Triassic/Jurassic boundary crisis is described. It was collected from the fossiliferous Lower Sinemurian (Semicostatum or Turneri Chronozone) strata of Burgundy (Mavilly-Mandelot, Côte-d’Or, France). The new taxon, Oxyarietites boletzkyi n. gen., n.sp., possesses an involute, compressed and keeled shell of suboxycone morphology, a shell type previously unknown for the Lower Sinemurian. The discovery makes younger by about 2 Ma the emergence of keeled (sub)oxycone shells following the Triassic/Jurassic boundary crisis. Its obviously keeled ventral area allows a probable assignation to the Arietitoidea Hyatt, 1875 sensu Guex (1995) superfamily, but family level assignation and its evolutionary origin remain obscure. Although, it is generally accepted that involute, compressed and keeled suboxycone and oxycone ammonite shells possess the best hydrodynamical abilities and mobility, the acquisition of this probable adaptive advantage in O. boletzkyi n. gen., n. sp. does not go together with abundancy in the fossil record.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference The Dababiya Corehole, Upper Nile Valley, Egypt: Preliminary results.
The Dababiya corehole was drilled in the Dababiya Quarry (Upper Nile Valley, Egypt), adjacent to the GSSP for the Paleocene/ Eocene boundary, to a total depth of 140 m and bottomed in the lower Maastrichtian Globotruncana aegyptiaca Zone of the Dakhla Shale Formation. Preliminary integrated studies on calcareous plankton (foraminifera, nannoplankton), benthic foraminifera, dinoflagellates, ammonites, geochemistry, clay mineralogy and geophysical logging indicate that: 1) The K/P boundary lies between 80.4 and 80.2 m, the Danian/Selandian boundary between ~ 41 and 43 m, the Selandian/Thanetian boundary at ~ 30 m (within the mid-part of the Tarawan Chalk) and the Paleocene/Eocene boundary at 11.75 m (base [planktonic foraminifera] Zone E1 and [calcareous nannoplankton] Zone NP9b); 2) the Dababiya Quarry Member (=Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum interval) extends from 11.75 to 9.5 m, which is ~1 m less than in the adjacent GSSP outcrop.; 3) the Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) depositional environment was nearshore, tropical-sub tropical and nutrient rich; the latest Maastrichtian somewhat more restricted (coastal); and the early Danian cooler, low(er) salinity with increasing warmth and depth of water (i.e., more open water); 4) the Paleocene is further characterized by outer shelf (~ 200 m), warm water environments as supported by foraminifera P/B ratios > 85% (~79-28 m), whereas benthic foraminifera dominate (>70%) from ~27-12 m (Tarawan Chalk and Hanadi Member) due, perhaps, in part to increased dissolution (as observed in nearby outcrop samples over this interval); 5) during the PETM, enhanced hydrodynamic conditions are inferred to have occurred on the sea-floor with increased river discharge (in agreement with sedimentologic evidence), itself a likely cause for very high enhanced biological productivity on the epicontinental shelf of Egypt; 6) correlation of in situ measured geophysical logs of Natural Gamma Ray (GR), Single-Point Resistance (PR), Self-Potential (SP), magnetic susceptibility(MS), and Resistivity, and Short Normal (SN) and Long Normal (LN) showed correspondence to the lithologic units. The Dababiya Quarry Member, in particular, is characterized by very high Gamma Ray and Resistivity Short Normal values.
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications
Article Reference Resolving an enigma by integrative taxonomy: Madagascarophis fuchsi (Serpentes: Lamprophiidae), a new opisthoglyphous and microendemic snake from northern Madagascar
Located in Library / RBINS Staff Publications