Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

You are here: Home / Library / RBINS Staff Publications / FORMIDABEL: The Belgian Ants Database

Dimitri Brosens, Francois Vankerkhoven, David Ignace, Philippe Wegnez, Nicolas Noe, Andre Heughebaert, Jeannine Bortels and Wouter Dekoninck (2013)

FORMIDABEL: The Belgian Ants Database

ZOOKEYS(306):59-70.

FORMIDABEL is a database of Belgian Ants containing more than 27.000 occurrence records. These records originate from collections, field sampling and literature. The database gives information on 76 native and 9 introduced ant species found in Belgium. The collection records originated mainly from the ants collection in Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (RBINS), the `Gaspar' Ants collection in Gembloux and the zoological collection of the University of Liege (ULG). The oldest occurrences date back from May 1866, the most recent refer to August 2012. FORMIDABEL is a work in progress and the database is updated twice a year. The latest version of the dataset is publicly and freely accessible through this url: http://ipt.biodiversity.be/resource.do?r=formidabel. The dataset is also retrievable via the GBIF data portal through this link: http://data.gbif.org/datasets/resource/14697 [GRAPHICS] A dedicated geo-portal, developed by the Belgian Biodiversity Platform is accessible at: http://www.formicidae-atlas.be Purpose: FORMIDABEL is a joint cooperation of the Flemish ants working group ``Polyergus'' (http://formicidae.be) and the Wallonian ants working group ``FourmisWalBru'' (http://fourmiswalbru.be). The original database was created in 2002 in the context of the preliminary red data book of Flemish Ants (Dekoninck et al. 2003). Later, in 2005, data from the Southern part of Belgium; Wallonia and Brussels were added. In 2012 this dataset was again updated for the creation of the first Belgian Ants Atlas (Figure 1) (Dekoninck et al. 2012). The main purpose of this atlas was to generate maps for all outdoor-living ant species in Belgium using an overlay of the standard Belgian ecoregions. By using this overlay for most species, we can discern a clear and often restricted distribution pattern in Belgium, mainly based on vegetation and soil types.

Open Access, Impact Factor, RBINS Collection(s)
Related content
Scientific Heritage Service

Document Actions

Menu

 
RBINS Staff
add or import reference(s)
  • add a PDF paper
    (Please follow editors copyrights policies)
  • add a PDF poster